Tuesday, February 27, 2007

Free will vs. God

Sorry for the extended absence. It's been a couple of extremely hectic months.

Original Blog Post

I was directed to this blog post by its author. It is one of those charming but muddled attempts to demonstrate that God absolutely must exist, using a somewhat jumbled mish-mash of science and philosophy. The author presented it to me with a degree of patronising smugness that almost begged me to annihilate it. Which is, thankfully, not hard.

The main defect of this argument is, obviously, it's christian-centric focus. The argument eventually boils down to stating that, for free will to exist, there must be a supernatural soul, therefore there must be a God. The author explicitly states that he is pre-supposing the existence of the Christian God, and therefore he does not bother to debate it. But it is, in fact, the heart of the matter. Even if one accepts the first part of the argument (a mish-mash of the human-centric conceit that because the rules of the universe are perfect for the formation of life, that they must have been set up expressly to create life. Hint: of course the laws of physics are conducive to life. We'd hardly be here if they weren't. The production of life against all odds would be a much stronger proof for a creator, yet life and its conditions exist in abundance.) then there is no reason for one to accept the second. This argument would work just fine for Buddhism, or Taoism, or Islam, or Wicca, or absolutely any religion that believes in some sort of soul really. Meanwhile, the free will argument is also weak: the author tackles only classical determinism, reducing the complexity of the debate on free will to a high-school simplification. Quantum physics is cherry-picked and misunderstood. The simultaneous existence of states of subatomic particles, the role of the observer, uncertainty theory, multiverse theory, all are overlooked. The author doesn't even seem to understand the nature of the Christian God: omnipresent, omniscient, omnipotent. God can't be put on a timeline at all, because, in a physics sense, God would be some sort of vast hypercube.

Anyway, what I'm saying is, it's crap, and I'm back, baby.